SMALL BUSINESS

SBA defines a small business as having less than 500 employees

Since 1953, the SBA has worked to ignite change and spark action so small businesses can confidently start, grow, expand, or recover. Visit sba.gov to learn more.

The US has 30.7 million small businesses

There were over 30 million small businesses in the nation in 2019, according to the SBA. While companies with fewer than 500 workers count as "small," the vast majority of businesses in the U.S. have a staff that's smaller than 20 workers, according to the Small Business & Entrepreneurship Council.

99.9% of US companies are small businesses
The American economy depends on small businesses. Companies of this size account for 99.9% of all businesses in the country, according to 2019 data from the SBA. Earlier data from the Small Business & Entrepreneurship Council found that nearly nine out of 10 employer firms in the U.S. had fewer than 20 workers.

Small businesses employ 59.9 million workers

Almost 60 million people in the U.S., or 47.3% of the country's workers, get their paychecks from small businesses, according to the SBA. Many of these companies have struggled to make ends meet during the pandemic, and layoffs at small businesses spiked by 1,021% from February to March, according to Gusto.

What Happens When You Shop Local?

1.

More of your money will be kept in your local economy

For every $100 you spend at locally owned businesses, $68 will stay in the community. What happens when you spend that same $100 at a national chain? Only $43 stays in the community.*

*Source: Civic Economics – Andersonville Study of Retail Economics.

2.

You embrace what makes your community unique

You wouldn’t want your house to look like everyone else’s in the U.S. So why would you want your community to look that way?

*Source: Civic Economics – Andersonville Study of Retail Economics.

3.

You create local jobs

Local businesses are better at creating higher-paying jobs for your neighbors. When you shop locally, you help create jobs for teachers, firemen, police officers, and many other essential professions.

*Source: Civic Economics – Andersonville Study of Retail Economics.

4.

You help the environment

Buying from a locally owned business conserves energy and resources in the form of less fuel for transportation and less packaging.

*Source: Civic Economics – Andersonville Study of Retail Economics.

5.

You nurture community

Local business owners know you, and you know them. Studies have shown that local businesses donate to community causes at more than twice the rate of chains.

*Source: Civic Economics – Andersonville Study of Retail Economics.

6.

You conserve your tax dollars

Shopping in a local business district means less infrastructure, less maintenance, and more money available to beautify your community. Also, spending locally instead of online ensures that your sales taxes are reinvested where they belong— in your community!

*Source: Civic Economics – Andersonville Study of Retail Economics.

7.

You create more choice

Locally owned businesses pick the items and products they sell based on what they know you like and want. Local businesses carry a wid­er array of unique products because they buy for their own individual markets.

*Source: Civic Economics – Andersonville Study of Retail Economics.

8.

You took advantage of their expertise

You are their friends and neighbors, and locally owned businesses have a vested interest in knowing how to serve you. They’re passionate about what they do. Why not take advantage of it?

*Source: Civic Economics – Andersonville Study of Retail Economics.

9.

You invested in entrepreneurship

Creativity and entrepreneurship are what the American economy is founded upon. Nurturing local business en­sures a strong community.

*Source: Civic Economics – Andersonville Study of Retail Economics.

10.

You made your community a destination

The more interesting and unique you community, the more we will attract new neighbors, visitors and guests. This benefits everyone!

*Source: Civic Economics – Andersonville Study of Retail Economics.

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